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The Fraternity and Sorority Community at Spring Hill College plays an integral role in campus life. The college hosts ten social Greek Lettered Organizations (four IFC fraternities, four Panhellenic sororities, and two NPHC sororities) and is over 500 members strong. Fraternity and sorority members are involved in almost every other campus organization and have majors in every academic discipline. Membership in a fraternal organization provides undergraduates and alumni with tremendous opportunities for lifelong friendship, leadership development, scholarship enhancement and social interaction. Our fraternity and sorority members are scholars, athletes, and campus leaders; they  positively contribute to and benefit from the Spring Hill College experience. We encourage all SHC students to learn more about the opportunity of membership in a fraternity or sorority.

IFC serves as the governing body for the recognized fraternities on Spring Hill College's campus. They meet weekly in the Student Center. To learn more about IFC and what they are currently working on visit the IFC webpage. Any questions may be directed to the IFC email account.
 
Officers:
President - Kyle Mistretta 
Vice President of Recruitment and Judicial - Ryan Ankersen
 

Vice President of Public Relations and Programming - Dylan Mire
Treasurer - 
Matt Mimlitz

President Elect - Alex Anderson 

Panhellenic is the governing body for the sororities on Spring Hill College's campus. They meet weekly on Thursdays at 5pm in the Student Center. To learn more about Panhellenic and what they are currently working on visit the Panhellenic webpage. Questions may be directed to the Panhellenic email account.
 
Executive Officers:
President - Stephanie Hightower
Vice President of Membership and Standards - Elizabeth Wellendorf
Vice President of Finance and Administration - Cameron Byrne

Vice President NPHC- Meagan Suttleff
President Elect - Caroline Cusick  
 
Directors:
Director of Programming - Sofia Diaz
Director of Service - Courtney Hutchinson

Director of External Relations - Maegan Lynch
Director of Inter-Fraternal Relations- Mary Jane Wattles
Order of Omega is a leadership honor society for members of Greek lettered organizations.  Order of Omega recognizes juniors and seniors who have exemplified high standards in the areas of scholarship, leadership, involvement within their respective organization and within the fraternity/sorority, campus, and local community. To learn more about Order of Omega visit the Order of Omega Website.

Delta Chi
Nickname: D-Chi
Colors: Red and Buff
Philanthropy: V Foundation for Cancer Research

Lambda Chi Alpha
Nickname: Lambda Chi
Colors: Royal Purple, Kelly Green and Old Gold
Philanthropy: North American Food Drive
 
Nickname: Sig-Chi
Colors: Blue and Old Gold
Philanthropy: Huntsman Cancer Institute
 
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Nickname: Teke
Colors: Cherry and Gray
Philanthropy: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

 

Delta Delta Delta 
Nickname: Tri Delta
Colors: Silver, Gold and Blue
Philanthropy: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Email
 
Delta Gamma 
Nickname: Dee Gee
Colors: Bronze, Pink and Blue
Philanthropy: Service for Sight
Email
 
Phi Mu
Nickname: Phi Mu
Colors: Rose and White
Philanthropy: Children's Miracle Network
Email
 
Nickname: Sigma Kappa
Colors: Lavender and Maroon
Philanthropy: Alzheimer's Disease/Gerontology  
Alpha Kappa Alpha
Nickname: AKA
Colors: Salmon Pink and Apple Green
Philanthropy: Educational Advancement Foundation
Email

Delta Sigma Theta

Nickname: Deltas
Colors: Crimson and Cream
Philanthropy: Delta Research and Educational Foundation
Email
 

Zeta Phi Beta

Nickname: Zetas
Colors: Royal Blue and Pure White
Philanthropy: Z-HOPE - Zetas Helping Other People Excel
Email
 

 

Students interested in joining a Greek Lettered Organization or simply learning more about fraternity and sorority life are encouraged to participate in Formal Recruitment. Spring Hill College has deferred Recruitment, which means Formal Recruitment occurs each spring semester. This allows students the opportunity to observe the social culture and to judge whether they can balance their time between academics and fraternity and sorority life. To join a fraternity or sorority students must be enrolled at SHC as a full-time student, have completed a minimum of twelve (12) credit hours, cannot be currently on disciplinary probation and cannot be a new or initiated member of any NIC, NPC or NPHC member organization. There are also, GPA requirements. Men wishing to join an NIC fraternity must have a minimum 2.5 and women wishing to join a NPC sorority must be in good academic standing, per the College Bulletin of Information. To learn more about Recruitment for each type of organization click below.

2017  Panhellenic Recruitment Dates
Mandatory Information Meeting: Thursday, January 12
Recruitment: Friday, January 13 - Sunday, January 15
Bid Day: Sunday, January 15 (evening)
 
To Register, please check back in the Fall 2016 semester .
 
ICS
For Chapters & Recruitment Guides
2017  IFC Recruitment Dates
Recruitment: Tuesday, January 17 - Sunday, January 22 
Registration open in Fall 2016 (now closed)
Please contact the organization you are interested in joining for more information.

Many times questions arise between parents and students alike about what the difference is between a recognized organization and an unrecognized one. The difference between recognized and unrecognized organizations is that unrecognized organizations do not have any support of oversight from the campus. There are many factors that may sway your student into joining an unrecognized organization, but we would like to clarify why it is a bad idea.

Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Gamma, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Sigma Theta, Phi Mu, Sigma Kappa, and Zeta Phi Beta are the 7 sororities recognized by Spring Hill College.

 

Delta Chi, Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Chi, and Tau Kappa Epsilon are the four fraternities recognized by Spring Hill College.

 

These eleven organizations must abide by the policies outlined in the Student Organization Handbook as well as by fraternity/sorority specific policy. The new member process is monitored by the college to ensure students are safe and they are going through a valuable learning experience. These organizations are (inter)nationally recognized, which means that they are also monitored by a larger organization and have rules and restrictions with their (inter)national affiliation.

 
Although the Spring Hill College Panhellenic Council requires only that a woman be in good academic standing with the College to participate in recruitment, each sorority chapter does have a minimum grade requirement for pledging and  initiation . Therefore, it is HIGHLY recommended that all prospective members participating in formal recruitment have at or above a 2.5 cumulative GPA at the time of recruitment. 

 

Men who are interested in a recognized IFC Fraternity must have a minimum 2.5 GPA to become a member. This GPA requirement exists to promote academic achievement of recognized fraternity and sorority students.

 

The recruitment process for freshmen wanting to join recognized fraternities or sororities happens in January. After joining an organization men and women will be educated about the values of that organization and of the Spring Hill College Fraternity and Sorority Community through a new member education process that lasts about eight weeks.

 

The New-Member Process

The new-member process differs from organization to organization, but as previously stated it is monitored by the College. Each recognized fraternity and sorority new member educator and president must meet with the Director of Student Involvement to review the chapter’s new member education plans prior to any mandatory meeting of new members.

 

Many chapters play trivia games about their organizations history, do bonding activities like go to a movie or an event on campus, attend educational programs on campus about hazing, alcohol, health and safety, and become lifelong friends with their new brothers or sisters.

 

Chapters also encourage studying daily. Since scholastic achievement is important to the recognized fraternity/sorority community, each organization finds ways to promote high academic standards within their active and new membership.

 

Each Spring the Interfraternity Council and College Panhellenic Association plan a new member workshop for all new members to promote the values of the Fraternity/Sorority Community as well as the Spring Hill College Community as a whole.

 

Being A Member

After initiation come the responsibilities of being a fraternity man or sorority woman. It is a rewarding experience to be a part of recognized fraternity/sorority life, and some of the things that recognized organizations do are used by unrecognized organizations to deter interested students from joining recognized organizations.

 

A value of our organizations is community service. Fraternity men and sorority women participate in a great deal of community service, both organized by the community and individually. In total, the fraternity/sorority community alone volunteered for nearly 4,000 hours last year.

 

A common concern with being in a recognized organization is dues. Dues are money owed to governing councils, (inter)national organizations and the individual chapter/colony to pay for the chapter/colony's needs. An overview of dues payments can be found under the FAQs section of this site as well as on chapter/colony webpages. If this is a concern of yours or your student’s, chapters offer payment plans to make sure that money owed will not steer them away from the fraternity/sorority experience.

 

Chapters also have social events throughout the semester. Recognized fraternities/sororities not only do great things for the college and the community, but they have fun in their free time. Each chapter has a "risk manager" to keep social gatherings safe. Recognized fraternities and sororities also are required to register invite parties and take additional precautions to keep the men and women attending events as safe as the chapter can.

 

After Graduation

Graduating as a recognized fraternity/sorority member has many benefits. Many activities, community service events, positions held, etc. may be helpful on a resume. All of the work they do is great resume material and is often used by students to get successful jobs after graduation. As a part of an unrecognized organization, many of these things would not be as prominent on a resume. Since unrecognized chapters are not affiliated with the campus, there is no proof that they actually held a position or that it was worth crediting. Also, recognized fraternity/sorority members have a large amount of community service opportunities that unrecognized Greeks may rarely or never encounter. Being a fraternity/sorority member is also has a rewarding networking capability. Alumni of chapters can set up job interviews for graduating members and those with national chapters can network with brothers and sisters across national and international boundaries.

As stated before, the difference between recognized and unrecognized organizations is that unrecognized organizations are not associated with the campus. At one time, these organizations may have been recognized but violated the Student Code of Conduct and were disaffiliated from the campus. If your student is thinking about joining an unrecognized organization, there are many problems that may arise in his or her time at Spring Hill.

 

The New-Member Process ("Pledging")

The college is not able to monitor the process; therefore these groups can do what they want with no discretion or fear of sanctions.

 

During the recruitment period (“rush”) unrecognized organizations may have a lot to say to interested students to make them decide that it would be a great idea to join. These organizations are not always truthful about this process and this is how students are often swayed to join.

 

Being A Member

Unrecognized organizations can give a bad reputation to all Greek Lettered Organizations both on campus and in the Mobile community. They often perpetuate the negative stereotypes that exist for fraternities and sororities.

 

After Graduation

Graduating as an unrecognized Greek lacks many benefits. As previously stated, any work done with an unrecognized organization is not verifiable by the campus and therefore does not help the student with their resume. Also, since some of these organizations only associate with themselves, they do not have much ability to network. They cannot refer a "sister of their sorority" or "brother of their fraternity" to employers because they may not be real organizations.

The fraternities and sororities at Spring Hill College have long been a vital part of our college community, fostering fellowship, leadership and community service.  The college has long supported and encouraged Greek organizations and all student organizations in their efforts to improve both the Spring Hill College and local Mobile communities.  This legacy should be preserved and nurtured by the best those organizations and individuals have to offer through active, authorized and officially recognized groups, organizations and clubs.

That said, the governing bodies of Greek Life, including the Inter-Fraternity Council and the Panhellenic Association, and the Office of Student Affairs have some serious concerns regarding students belonging to unrecognized student organizations, including unrecognized Greek organizations.  While student organizations and their advisors have a great deal of freedom to run their organizations, the Office of Student Affairs and the Dean of Students have the obligation to oversee and manage the overall process, to support our student organizations, and to ensure organizations and activities are supportive of the college's Mission as well as it’s policies.  Membership in such organizations must be a safe and productive learning experience. 

Student Participation in Unrecognized Organizations

As our Student Handbook states, “It is the policy of Spring Hill College that all student organizations be recognized and registered through the Center for Student Involvement.”   This policy exists because the administrators of the College are charged to facilitate, mentor and manage the operation of student organizations on our campus.  Any suggested new student organization must first obtain the approval of the Dean of Students and once approved, register annually with the Office of Student Involvement. 

The College reserves the right to determine if a student organization is adhering to the Mission Statement and following college policies regarding these groups.  These procedures are accepted practice at most colleges and universities across the country.   Our Student Handbook states that it is a violation of college policy to operate as an unregistered or unauthorized organization, one where we have reasonable belief that individual students are operating as a student organization but have not obtained the required approval.   In the event of inappropriate behavior within an unauthorized group or organization, and thus no official organization to hold accountable, the college then must hold its individual student members accountable.  The College will also hold accountable, through legal action if necessary, outside entities that purport to be in partnership with Spring Hill College when in fact they are not.  The College must legally safeguard our students and the integrity of our process against those that would attempt to circumvent it.


Want More Information?

Please submit the following information so we can better answer questions you may have about fraternity or sorority life.


Name:
Email Address:
Type of Information Requested:
General Information
National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) Sorority NPHC Website
National Panhellenic Conference (NPC) Sorority NPC Website
North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) Fraternity NIC Website
Specific Question/Concern:

Looking for additional information about fraternity and sorority life in general? Here are some helpful links and information to point you in the right direction.

The following forms can be found by clicking here:
  • Roster Form
  • Anti-Hazing Contract
  • New Member Bill of Rights
  • Grade Release
  • Party Invite List

Alumna: A graduated member of a Women's Sorority/fraternity: Plural Alumnae. Alumnae often support chapter activities through donations, assistance with advising, employment of undergraduates, etc.

Alumni Association: An organization of alumni from an individual fraternity or sorority. The association may be based on geographical location or chapter.

Alumnus: A graduated member of a Men's fraternity: Plural Alumni. Alumni often support chapter activities through donations, assistance with advising, employment of undergraduates, etc.

Badge/Pin (two types): The active pin is worn on the chest designating an initiated member of a certain fraternity. A new member or associate pin is simpler and is used to designate a new member or associate member of a particular fraternity.

Bid: An invitation to become a member of a fraternity or sorority.

Big Brother/Sister: An older member assigned to assist a new member or associate member.

Brother: An initiated member of a fraternity. It is used as a term of address when an initiated member refers to another member.

Call: The verbal greeting NPHC members within a certain fraternity/sorority give each other.

Chapter: The local campus group of an International fraternity or sorority.

Chapter Advisor: An alumna/alumnus who establishes and maintains a close advisory relationship with a chapter and serves as a teacher, counselor and friend.

Colony: A newly-organized group working toward becoming a chartered chapter of an international fraternity or sorority.

Continuous Open Bidding: Some NPC affiliated chapters continue to recruit and pledge women throughout the school year.

Crossing: A term used by NPHC groups to indicate that a new member has been fully initiated into the group.

Culturally Based Greek Letter Organization: A fraternity or sorority that has aspects of a specific culture incorporated into its ritual, purpose and ceremonies.

Depledge: The process of terminating one's fraternity membership (pledging) before initiation.

Faculty/Staff Advisor: A faculty/staff member who is the organization's representative to the university and who advises the organization on university matters.

Formal Recruitment: The major period of time set aside by the NPC and NIC Chapters for meeting potential new members.

Fraternity: A men's Greek organization. Some sororities are identified as a fraternity in their official name; others describe themselves as being a "woman's fraternity".

Greek Organization: A fraternity or sorority (social, honor, or professional). See Also Greeks.

Greeks: Members of a fraternity or sorority. The term Greek is used because a majority of fraternities and sororities use Greek letters to distinguish themselves.

Hand Sign: A hand gesture made to identify a particular organization.

Hazing: Any conduct which subjects another person, whether physically, mentally, emotionally, or psychologically, to anything that may endanger, abuse, degrade, or intimidate the person as a condition of association with a group or organization, regardless of the person's consent or lack of consent.

Inactive Member: A member who has no material participation in undergraduate chapter activities, such as social activities or voting at undergraduate chapter meetings.

Informal Recruitment: A continuous, open recruitment period with no specific, scheduled, system-wide activities of recruitment and pledging. Bids may be extended and accepted at any time - see also Continuous Open Bidding.

Informational: A forum for individuals interested in seeking more information about a particular NPHC fraternity or sorority.

Initiation: A formal ceremony in which an individual becomes a full member of a Greek organization.

(Inter)National Headquarters: The central organization of a particular fraternity or sorority.

Legacy: A son/daughter, brother/sister, grandson/granddaughter or nephew/niece of a fraternity/sorority member.

Line: Individuals going through the membership intake process for each NPHC organization.

Member: See Active.

Membership Intake: A term given to National Pan - Hellenic Council (NPHC) fraternities' and sororities' membership process.

National Pan-Hellenic Conference (NPC): The governing body for 26 national and international women's fraternities/sororities. (See also www.npcwomen.org)

National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC): The governing body for nine fraternities and sororities, the “Divine Nine.” (See also www.nphchq.org)

New Member: A person who has accepted a bid to join a fraternity or sorority chapter but has not yet been initiated. Also see Associate Member.

North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC): The governing body for 66 national and international men's fraternities. (See also www.nicindy.org)

Philanthropy: Community service events done by fraternities and sororities to raise money for local and national charities. Each organization has their own philanthropy to which they donate time, money, and energy.

Potential New Member (PNM): A person who is going through recruitment to join a Greek organization.

Probate Show: A term used by NPHC groups to designate the time when new members of such groups present themselves to the campus. Those joining an NPHC group are generally not known and thus it is a time when the new members are revealed. Typically, stepping is demonstrated as well as testimonials from the new members.

Neophyte: A new member of an NPHC fraternity or sorority.

New Member Program: A time before initiation during which new members learn about their fraternity, its new members, activities, and responsibilities.

Recruitment Chair: The person from each fraternity or sorority who is in charge of each chapter's rush functions.

Recruitment: A process (and period of time) of membership recruitment by Greek organizations. Recruitment is primarily a process for exchanging information: Fraternity and sorority members give information about their respective organizations to potential new members (PNMs). The PNMs give information about themselves and inquire about the missions, philosophies, financial obligations, Alumni opportunities and membership commitment of the organization. It is an active process on both sides to ensure that new members are properly matched with a Greek Letter Organization (GLO). Every fraternity is not for every potential new member and vice versa.

Ritual: The traditional beliefs and oaths of a sorority or fraternity usually used in reference to the Ceremonies of Initiation as well as weekly chapter meetings. These traditions do not include any forms of hazing, because hazing weakens the bonds of brotherhood / sisterhood, and undermines the common experience of the fraternity or sorority. Ritual does however, ensure that all members share a common experience across multiple campuses and generations.

Sister: An initiated member of a sorority/women's fraternity. It is used as a form of address when one initiated member is refers to another member.

Sorority: A group of women joined together in friendship for leadership and academic purposes.

Stepping: A traditional performance involving dance, marching, calls, and symbolism of the traditional culture of an organization.

Strolling: Traditional dances or "party walks" at NPHC fraternity or sorority social events.

Yard: A term used by NPHC groups to indicate the campus. Used in phrases such as "which groups are on the yard," meaning which groups are presently active at SHC.

Α - Alpha
Β - Beta
Γ - Gamma
Δ - Delta
Ε - Epsilon
Ζ - Zeta
Η - Eta
Θ - Theta
Ι - Iota
Κ - Kappa
Λ - Lambda
Μ - Mu
Ν - Nu
Ξ - Xi
Ο - Omicron
Π - Pi
Ρ - Rho
Σ - Sigma
Τ - Tau
Υ - Upsilon
Φ - Phi
Χ - Chi
Ψ - Psi
Ω - Omega

This section will answer some of the questions you have about fraternity and sorority life at SHC. If you have questions that are not answered here please contact greeks@shc.edu and we will be happy to answer those.

Being part of a fraternity or sorority can be one of the most rewarding experiences a student can have while at college. Unfortunately, there are some groups that are not affiliated with Spring Hill College that utilize the enticement of this experience to recruit students. Students are prohibited from affiliating with these unrecognized or “underground” organizations. Affiliation includes joining, rushing, pledging, or being involved in any activity that would be association with being a member of the organization. Students who affiliate with unrecognized organizations may be subject to judicial action.

 

The ONLY fraternities/sororities recognized at Spring Hill College are:

  • Alpha Kappa Alpha
  • Delta Chi
  • Delta Delta Delta
  • Delta Gamma
  • Delta Sigma Theta
  • Kappa Alpha Psi
  • Lambda Chi Alpha
  • Sigma Chi
  • Sigma Kappa (coming Spring 2014)
  • Tau Kappa Epsilon

Organizations that are currently known to be operating on the Spring Hill College campus with no oversight or support from the institution are:

·        “OG” Sorority

 

To learn more about the differences between recognized and unrecognized organizations click here .  

 
There is a required meeting once a week where you receive information on chapter events and participate in other educational events. New members typically have a separate weekly meeting to learn more about their new fraternity or sorority. Weekly chapter study sessions are an option for many members. Members who choose to take leadership roles may have additional meetings and responsibilities. In addition, weekend events like brotherhood/sisterhood activities, community service projects, and social events are also an option. Remember, the more you put into the organization, the more you will get out of it!
A study by the U.S. Office of Education found that less than 2% of an average college student’s expenses goes toward fraternity or sorority dues. The money you do contribute to your organization will benefit you. Your financial benefits include:
  • Educational and personal development workshops.
  • Brotherhood and sisterhood events.
  • Lifelong membership in an (inter)national organization.
  • Participation in community service events.
  • Participation in social events such as Greek Weekend and chapter formal and semi-formal dances.
Each potential new member should be aware of the financial responsibilities of fraternity/sorority life before joining a sorority or fraternity. On average, the first semester of membership is more expensive than the following semesters. During the New Member Education semester, dues at Spring Hill College range from $400.00-$700.00. Semester dues for initiated/active members range from $300.00-$400.00. These costs exclude sorority/fraternity paraphernalia. Typically, dues are turned in at the beginning of the semester. Payment plans and scholarships are also available.
Spring Hill College has deferred recruitment, which means formal recruitment activities occur each spring semester. This allows students the opportunity to meet a variety of other students and observe the social culture here. By spring semester they are also more equipped to judge whether they can balance their time between academics and fraternity/sorority life.
A student is eligible to participate in recruitment and join a fraternity/sorority if he/she is enrolled at Spring Hill College as a full-time student, meets minimum grade requirements and is not a new or initiated member of any NIC, NPC or NPHC member organization. A full-time student is defined as having 12 credit hours per semester, excluding correspondence courses and courses at other colleges or universities.
 
Men wishing to join an NIC fraternity must have a minimum 2.5 GPA and women wishing to join a NPC sorority must be in good academic standing, per the College Bulletin of Information. All chapters strongly adhere to their grade requirements and i ndividual chapters may require a higher GPA. Greek Lettered Organizations were founded primarily upon principles of academic excellence and this is a primary consideration in membership selection.
Greek Lettered Organizations take many things into consideration when recruiting members. As a general rule, fraternities and sororities seek out members who excel both inside and outside of the classroom, have high moral character and who have a commitment to service. In addition, some groups may require letters of recommendation or an official application.